Parents of missing Mexican students travel to U.S. to appeal to pope

Categories: Latest News

September 21, 2015

Images of college students who went missing in Mexico's Guerrero state are set outside the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix by immigration reform advocates in this file photo from Nov. 20, 2014. (CNS photo/Nancy Wiechec) See MEXICO-STUDENTS-POPE Sept. 21, 2015.

Images of college students who went missing in Mexico’s Guerrero state are set outside the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix by immigration reform advocates in this file photo from Nov. 20, 2014. (CNS photo/Nancy Wiechec)

MEXICO CITY (CNS) — Peasant farmer Emiliano Navarrete lost his son one year ago, in an attack on 43 teacher trainees in southern Guerrero state. He still holds out hope that his son, Jose Angel Navarrete, 18, and his classmates are alive, even though Mexican investigators insist the 43 young men were kidnapped and killed by police acting in cahoots with criminals, while their bodies were burned in a landfill.

“There were never searches done as they should have been done,” said Navarrete, secretary-general of a parents’ support group, echoing one of the reasons the families continue protesting. “The government didn’t seem to care.”

Parents and classmates of the missing students have expressed dissatisfaction with the official investigation and what they say is indifference and incompetence on the part of police, public officials and politicians. They’ve taken their cause abroad as protests in Mexico peter out and the Mexican government tries to turn the page on a crime that sullied the country’s international image and sent the president’s popularity plummeting.

Read more in The Visitor…