Prayer, patience buffered Washington Post employee against racism

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August 5, 2015

Edward Monroe, 85, pictured in a mid-April photo in Washington, says prayer and patience helped him through difficult times of racism and steered him to a successful 40-year career at The Washington Post. (CNS photo/James Martone) See WASHINGTON-MONROE Aug. 5, 2015.

Edward Monroe, 85, pictured in a mid-April photo in Washington, says prayer and patience helped him through difficult times of racism and steered him to a successful 40-year career at The Washington Post. (CNS photo/James Martone)

WASHINGTON (CNS) — Prayer and patience helped octogenarian Edward Monroe through difficult times of racism and steered him to success at his city’s most prominent newspaper, the native Washingtonian reminisced.

Monroe graduated in 1949 from Washington’s Armstrong Technical High School, one of the city’s two segregated manual training schools for African-American youth. He started as a substitute compositor at The Washington Post and, by 1953, he had worked his way into a permanent position in the composing room, where typesetting and related operations were performed.

It was a job he loved, but it “wasn’t easy,” he said, in part because he was one of very few blacks in what was then a predominantly white and often racist workplace.

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