Survey shows increase in Americans who aren’t part of any religion

Categories: Latest News

May 13, 2015

A woman prays in a pew at a Catholic shrine in Champion, Wis., Oct. 8. New data from the Pew Research Center shows the number of Americans who say they have no religious affiliation is increasing. (CNS photo/Darren Hauck, Reuters) (Oct. 9, 2012) See PEW-AFILLIATION Oct. 9, 2012.

A woman prays in a pew at a Catholic shrine in Champion, Wis. Data from the Pew Research Center survey of 35,000 people, conducted in 2014, found that the percentage of Americans who identify themselves as Christians declined by 8 percentage points since the last religious landscape survey in 2007. (CNS photo/Darren Hauck, Reuters)

WASHINGTON (CNS) — A major study of the religious landscape of the United States shows a continuing decline in the number of people who consider themselves part of any religion, with the largest shift occurring among the “millennial” generation.

The Pew Research Center survey of 35,000 people, conducted in 2014, found that the percentage of Americans who identify themselves as Christians declined by 8 percentage points since the last religious landscape survey in 2007. The first data from the survey, released May 12, dealt primarily with religious affiliation. Future reports will address other parts of the survey, such as religious beliefs and practices.

The phenomena of people changing religions also has become more pronounced, the survey found, and said that is especially true for people who were raised Catholic.

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